• 1975 - Founded as Solar Technology International

    Founded as Solar Technology International

    1975 – Our late founder Bill Yerkes is responsible for much of the technology used in all modern solar panels, including the lamination process that keeps the solar cells safe for decades. Today SolarWorld continues to honor the legacy of one of the first men to bring solar to the people. Click the image to watch the video.

  • 1980 - First 1-megawatt of solar panels manufactured in a year

    First 1-megawatt of solar panels manufactured in a year

    1980 - What took us a year to make now takes us less than a day. The technology has come a long way from our early days.

  • 1982 - First UL-listed solar module

    First UL-listed solar module

    1982 – Our solar panels were the first ever to meet the premier standard of electrical safety that is validated by the Underwriters Laboratories.

  • 1982 - First grid-tied megawatt solar system

    First grid-tied megawatt solar system

    1982 – In addition to making the megawatt of panels in this system, we engineered and developed this historic project in the California desert. During its lifetime, this system produced many megawatt-hours of energy.

  • 1985 - First net zero residential solar development

    First net zero residential solar development

    1985 - A community in the Phoenix, Arizona area is was the first ever residential community to achieve net zero status – generating more power than they consume – thanks in large part to the large American-made solar panel array they share access to.

  • First manufacturer to 100 megawatts

    1996 - This historic achievement took us 21 years to achieve, but these days SolarWorld can manufacture 100 megawatts in less than a month.

  • 1987 - First all-black crystalline silicon solar module

    First all-black crystalline silicon solar module

    1987 – We were the first company to make aesthetically-pleasing all-black solar panels available to residential solar customers. This is more than two decades before most solar panel manufacturers even came into existence.

  • 2008 - First plus-sorted solar modules, ensuring at least nameplate power

    First plus-sorted solar modules, ensuring at least nameplate power

    2008 - SolarWorld introduced plus-sorting, which guarantees that all solar panels have anywhere between 0 and 5 watts more than is listed on their nameplate. Giving you “everything you pay for” means that there will never be an issue of underpowered modules reducing the effectiveness of any other modules in their string.

  • 1997 - First 25-year warranty on solar panels

    First 25-year warranty on solar panels

    1997 – After more than two decades of manufacturing solar panels, we became confident that our panels could last at least 25 years and still be producing at 80% of their original power. Now we can point to hundreds of systems that have performed beyond these standards even with 25-year or older technology.

  • 2009 - First 25-year linear warranty

    First 25-year linear warranty

    2009 - Improving on the stepped 25-year warranty (90% performance guarantee first 10 years, 80% last 15 years), SolarWorld is the first to issue a guarantee that our panels will decrease in power by no more than 0.7% per year, resulting in no less than 80% of nameplate performance in year 25. This has become the industry, regardless of other manufacturers’ ability to prove their products can meet these guarantees in real-world conditions.

  • 2012 - First commercial volumes of mono PERC modules

    First commercial volumes of mono PERC modules

    2012 - SolarWorld was the first company to take the high-powered mono PERC (Passivated Emitter Rear Contact) cell technology and use it to produce both cells and solar panels in commercial quantities.

  • 2017 - First company to reach 42 continuous years of solar panel manufacturing

    First company to reach 42 continuous years of solar panel manufacturing

    2017 – Coincidentally, that’s also 42 continuous years of American solar panel manufacturing.